In the future, synthetic humans are as common as automobiles today.

Don’t lie, wouldn’t it be fun to kick the tires?

In a previous blog, I posted a rambling essay on roboethics and the misuse of synths. However, in the world of The Lightstream Chronicles, most synths are used well within the limits of the law and those like Marie and Toei are almost ubiquitous. As we can see in page 79, Lee Chen’s houseboy is a synth, and a masseuse. People in the 22nd century look at synths the way people in the 21st century looked at cars. The wealthier you are the more likely you are to have more than one synth and probably more sophisticated in their design and feature set. Those in the lower income brackets might have an older or more basic model. You might even find those who are strapped for New Asia credits to be doing their own synth repairs and cobbling together parts from scrap or other models.

The average future family has one synth, like Marie, usually a domestic who doubles as a nanny, cooks cleans, and handles a variety of household chores. The price for a domestic synth varies based upon what the unit is capable of doing. Slightly analogous to the smart phone of the 21st century, the feature set of a synth can be augmented or uploaded with apps, called scripps, that could include features such as language proficiency, and levels of expertise such as in medicine or music. Scripps are moderately priced, but based on the model there are limitations to scripp memory. Special functions such as sex organs are another optional feature.

There is also a booming business in synth companions. At the top of the line are recent improvements on nearly human characteristics such as those present in Keiji-T. Keiji’s T-Class designation is, of course, reserved for the police force, however the domestic counterpart would be an H-Class. This class of synth can also be modeled to a near-exact visual duplicate grown from its owners DNA.

Synths can also be built to resemble any species or even combination of species. Nearly half of all domestic pets are synthetic. Popular cross-species varieties are Homo sapiens crossed with Canis Lupus Familiaris, Reptilia, Felidae, Ursidae, and Delphinidae. Many of these blends can also be done in the lab combining human DNA though the variations are considerably fewer.

 

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