A good hacker doesn’t need to read your mind to know what you’re thinking.

In The Lightstream Chronicles, telepathic communication, the sharing of experiences and memories, and direct cerebral connection to the Lightstream are commonplace. That’s why Kristin Broulliard and Col. Chen can have a conversation without speaking and they can do it separated by miles. In the same way that we can rifle an email to someone across the planet within milliseconds, the society of the The Lightstream Chronicles can communicate with virtually anyone. In a similar fashion to our current smart phone technology, however, you must have an “address” and the requisite “permissions” to share memories or experiences with others. All very neat and tidy, except just as we are quick to adapt to new technologies, there are those who are quick to hack them.

An article last year in i09 author George Dvorsky posed questions to a professor of cybernetics, a neuroscientist and a futurist about telepathy and the plausibility of  direct mind communication. The idea of brains connecting and transmitting is, apparently not that far fetched. The technological concepts exist and numerous experiments have proven the viability of brain transmission. The only thing missing is probably the funding to make it seamless and painless. But data transmission, whether it is in the form of texts from your smart phone or thoughts from your head, will be subject to the similar dangers. From the aforementioned article, futurist Ramez Naam states, “There’s the risk of malware or viruses that infect this. There’s the risk of hackers being able to break into the implants in your head. We’ve already seen hackers demonstrate that they can remotely take over pacemakers and insulin pumps. The same risks exist here.”

But a good hacker won’t have to intercept your thoughts to determine what you are going to do next. The right hack, to Google, or Facebook, or Twitter will reveal so much data about your whereabouts, your proclivities, your favorites, your daily schedule and all of your other preferences, that they will quite accurately be able to predict exactly what you will do next. For that, I recommend The Naked Future: What Happens in a World That Anticipates Your Every Move?

If you follow the blog you know that privacy is a recurring topic here. If you are concerned that it is just a matter of time until someone hacks “the Cloud” to get all of your sensitive documents and digital data, then the danger will likely still exist when it’s your memories and experiences that are stored there as well. Yet evidence would show that possibilities like this don’t really concern most people. There are lots of Clouds, lots of data and lots of people using it. In other words, the possibility of bad things happening doesn’t deter us from participating and adapting to these changes.

I guess we would have to get into the philosophy of privacy to really knead this topic. So I’ll save it for another time. What do you think?

Bookmark and Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.