Welcome your new synthetic companion. Where will artificial intelligence go?

And now, back to the future.

In a previous post I looked at the pros and cons of creating a living adult human through a process known as progenation, or genning, as not always successful, despite government assurances that the failure rate is miniscule. The process takes about 4 weeks and the resulting human can be created to the exact age of the customer, however, you cannot order, for example, a younger version of yourself, nor can you be genned if you are under the age of consent, which is 16.

The legal age of consent notwithstanding, there is science behind the decision. Though the body can be developed to the precise age of the customer, based on exact DNA imprinting, the brain, remains an empty mass of tissue. In a sense, since it was grown in the lab, it has no “experiences”, no learning, and no cognitive processes. The final phase of genning is “brain accretion transference” (BAT), where all mental, cognitive and experiential data from the living brain of the original human donor, is transferred to the progenated being. If successful, the progenation process is complete. The government reports the success rate for transference at around 92%, but some sources put the number much lower. When transference fails, there is no way to repeat the process and the living body must be terminated. Additionally, there are anecdotal reports that even successful progens, after years of life, can die suddenly without explanation or display psychotic episodes.

The genning process is expensive and usually reserved for the wealthy, though it is possible to engage a less reputable lab to gen for a fraction of a government sanctioned progen. These labs are, of course, illegal.

The other option, if you are looking for a same, is to build a synthetic human. It is much more reliable and though the final product is not quite a duplicate, the results are considered much more predictable. Plus, you can program out your bad or annoying traits and make the new you more assertive — or submissive. This is just one of the many options in the booming synthetic industry led by companies like AHC.

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One of the latest ads from Almost Human Corporation.

 

Since “grey matter” in a synth is a specifically configured quantum brain, the customer can upload their brain and personality into a synth for the identical synthetic version of themselves, or choose from thousands of other personality types. A same synth is comparably priced with the genned version, but there are also thousands of variations and feature sets that make owning a synth within reach for most of the populace. going the synthetic route also carries fewer restrictions, child synths, for example are also available (saming restrictions still apply).

Synthetics range in style from commercial labor synths to domestic, extended family versions, animal, pleasure models, and expert systems just to name a few.

Science fiction?

This may all sound like crazy talk, or just fun science fiction, but it isn’t an unreasonable trajectory based our current interests in the advancing technology and our human proclivities to adapt and adopt these technologies when they come to life. We already have signs of this. There is Paro the baby seal robot therapist, Zoomer the interactive robopuppy, and activists for synthetic love. While most scientists believe that we are looking to decades in the future before we have an operating system as lifelike and emotive as the one in the movie Her, if you pull those threads into the future of The Lightstream Chronicles, an industry every bit as developed as our current day automobile industry does not seem like a stretch. As far a uploading our minds into a machine, Ray Kurzweil sees that happening much sooner.

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