On eavesdropping on your thoughts and the reason for fences.

Sending and receiving thoughts is not that far fetched.

Last year the science media was abuzz with the news that a thought (basically “hello”) was transmitted from India to France. The experiment was clunky and primitive with lots of wires and electrodes, and took 70 minutes to complete, but it was a step in the direction of telepathic transmission. 1. In other labs, scientists are finding ways to translate thoughts into words through implanted electrodes in the brain. 2  From these reports it would appear that telepathic transmissions like the ones shown in The Lightstream Chronicles are decades or more away. But, as we know, technology tracks an exponential growth. What used to take years or decades to develop now happens much faster. The mobile phone was once the size of a brick and could only make phone calls. Now the basic smart phone is a thousand times more powerful than the most sophisticated computer of 15 years ago. If we look at the speed with which technology expands then it is quite possible that some of our most sci-fi imaginings are really just around the corner. Both sets of researchers cite the obvious benefits for those who are speech impaired, paralyzed, or perhaps in a coma which would be tremendous breakthroughs for medicine and psychology. Of course, I tend to think toward the dark side. As the one researcher in the India-France experiment noted, “‘Could there be potential for sending someone a thought that’s not desirable to them?’ he says. ‘Those kinds of things are theoretically in the realm of possibility.’”

In this weeks episode of The Lightstream Chronicles, Keiji-T is eavesdropping on a conversation between Kristin Broulliard and Colonel Lee Chen. The intercepted data is analyzed the identities of the parties is verified and the transcript committed to memory — human or otherwise. Keiji-T’s marvelous technological features are a huge benefit to crime fighting. Before the introduction of Keiji-T’s state-of-the-art faculties thought transmissions were inaccessible. With so much implanted circuitry in the human brain the pioneers of telepathy created sophisticated and impenetrable encryptions to protect our thoughts and telepathic communications from being intercepted or “overheard”. With the introduction of the T-Class synthetic, that fence came down. All in the name of security, of course

In a broadly interpreted and paraphrased thought from the author G. K. Chesterton, (though this not really what he said), “Don’t ever take a fence down until you know the reason why it was put up.” (If you wan to know what he really said go here.) Nevertheless, the spirit of the quote stands. As a society we are forever tearing down fences in the name of anything from the greater good to freedom or security. The Lightstream Chronicles is sometimes a reminder that regardless of the sophistication of our implants, the human condition prevails.

Citations:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/scientists-prove-that-telepathic-communication-is-within-reach-180952868/?no-ist
http://phys.org/news180620740.html
http://www.chesterton.org/taking-a-fence-down/
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One thought on “On eavesdropping on your thoughts and the reason for fences.”

  1. “telepathy” can be more than textual, with the increasing sensitivity of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQIDS) you can basically interpret the electrical activity in the brain and conceiveably induce similar resonant patterns elsewhere. There’s a whole branch of cogno-informational neuroscience that is looking at augmented wet-hardware interfaces.

    However, caselaws are based on traditions and societal norms. The current situation wrt US is that a court cannot compel a suspect to divulge their encrypted passphrase though police can use technical means to crack a smartphone accesscode … up to tricking the suspect. The funny thing is that the more security is increased for the “elite” the less safe/happy the rest of the population feels (in violation of their expected norms)

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