What did one AI say to the other AI?

 

I know what you want.

A design foundations student recently asked my advice on a writing assignment, something that might be affected by or affect design in the future. I told him to look up predictive algorithms. I have long contended that logic alone indicates that predictive algorithms, taking existing data and applying constraints, can be used to solve a problem, answer a question, or design something. With the advent of big data, the information going in only amplifies the veracity of the recommendations coming out. In case you haven’t noticed, big data is, well, big.

One of the design practitioners that I follow is Amy Webb. Amy has been thinking about this longer than I have but clearly, we think alike, and we are looking at the same things. I don’t know if she is as alarmed as I am. We’ve never spoken. In her recent newsletter, her focus was on what else, predictive algorithms. Amy alerted me to a whole trove of new developments. There were so many that I have decided to make it a series of blogs starting with this one.

Keep in mind, that as I write this these technologies are in their infancy. If the already impress you, then the future will likely blow you away. The first was something known as, Project Dreamcatcher from Autodesk. These are the people who make Maya, and AutoCAD and much of the software that designers, animators, engineers and architects use every day. According to the website:

“The Dreamcatcher system allows designers to input specific design objectives, including functional requirements, material type, manufacturing method, performance criteria, and cost restrictions. Loaded with design requirements, the system then searches a procedurally synthesized design space to evaluate a vast number of generated designs for satisfying the design requirements. The resulting design alternatives are then presented back to the user, along with the performance data of each solution, in the context of the entire design solution space.”

Another on Amy’s list was Google’s recently announced RankBrain, Google’s next venture into context-aware platforms using advances in predictive algorithms to make what you see scarily tailored to who you are. According to Amy from a 2012 article (this is old news folks):

“With the adoption of the Siri application, iOS 5 mobile phones (Apple only) can now compare location, interests, intentions, schedule, friends, history, likes, dislikes and more to serve content and answers to questions.”

In other words, there’s lots more going on than you think when Siri answers a question for you. Well RankBrain takes this to the next level, according to Bloomberg who broke the story on RankBrain:

“For the past few months, a “very large fraction” of the millions of queries a second that people type into the company’s search engine have been interpreted by an artificial intelligence system, nicknamed RankBrain…’Machine learning is a core transformative way by which we are rethinking everything we are doing,’ said Google’s Chief Executive Officer Sundar Pichai on the company’s earnings call last week.”

By the way, so far, most AI predicts much more accurately than we do, humans that is.

If this is moving too fast for you, next week, thanks to Amy, I’ll highlight some applications of AI that will have you squirming.

PS— if you wan to follow Amy Webb go here.

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