Your robot buddy is almost ready.

 

There is an impressive video out this week showing a rather adept robot going through the paces, so to speak, getting smacked down and then getting back up again. The year is 2016, and the technology is striking. The company is Boston Dynamics. One thing you know from reading this blog is that I ascribe to The Law of Accelerating Returns. So, as we watch this video, if we want to be hyper-critical we can see that the bot still needs some shepherding, tentatively handles the bumpy terrain, and is slow to get up after a violent shove to the floor. On the other hand, if you are at all impressed with the achievement, then you know that the people working on this will only make it better, agiler, more svelt, and probably faster on the comeback. Let’s call this ingredient one.

 

Last year I devoted several blogs to the advancement of AI, about the corporations rushing to be the go-to source for the advanced version of predictive behavior and predictive decision-making. I have also discussed systems like Amazon Echo that use the advanced Alexa Voice Service. It’s something like Siri on steroids. Here’s part of Amazon’s pitch:

“• Hears you from across the room with far-field voice recognition, even while music is playing
• Answers questions, reads audiobooks and the news, reports traffic and weather, gives info on local businesses, provides sports scores and schedules, and more with Alexa, a cloud-based voice service
• Controls lights, switches, and thermostats with compatible WeMo, Philips Hue, Samsung SmartThings, Wink, Insteon, and ecobee smart home devices
•Always getting smarter and adding new features and skills…”

You’re supposed to place it in a central position in the home where it is proficient at picking up your voice from the other room. Just don’t go too far. The problem with Echo is that its stationery. Call Echo ingredient two. What Echo needs is ingredient one.

Some of the biggest players in the AI race right now are Google, Amazon, Apple, Facebook, IBM, Elon Musk, and the military, but the government probably won’t give you a lot of details on that. All of these billion-dollar companies have a vested interest in machine learning and predictive algorithms. Not the least of which is Google. Google already uses Voice Search, “OK, Google.” to enable type-free searching. And their AI algorithm software TensorFlow has been open-sourced. The better that a machine can learn, the more reliable the Google autonomous vehicle will be. Any one of these folks could be ingredient three.

I’m going to try and close the loop on this, at least for today. Guess who bought Boston Dynamics last year? That would be corporation X, formerly known as Google X.

 

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