Who are you?

 

There have been a few articles in the recent datasphere have centered around the pervasive tracking of our online activity from the benign to those bordering on unethical. One was from FastCompany that highlighted some practices that web marketers use to track the folks that visit their sites. The article by Steve Melendez lists a handful of these. They include the basics like first party cookies, and A/B testing, to more invasive methods such as psychological testing (thanks, Facebook) third-party tracking cookies, and differential pricing. The cookie is, of course, the most basic. I use them on this site and on The Lightstream Chronicles to see if anyone is visiting, where they’re coming from and a bunch of other minutiae. Using Google Analytics, I can, for example, see what city or country my readers are coming from, age and sex, whether they are regulars or new visitors, whether they visit via mobile or desktop, Apple or Windows, and if they came to my site by way of referral, where did they originate. Then I know if my ads for the graphic novel are working. I find this harmless. I have no interest in knowing your sexual preference, where you shop, and above all, I’m not selling anything (at least not yet). I’m just looking for more eyeballs. More viewers mean that I’m not wasting my time and that somebody is paying attention. It’s interesting that a couple of months ago the EU internet authorities sent me a snippet of code that I was “required” to post on the LSC site alerting my visitors that I use cookies. Aside from they U.S., my highest viewership is from the UK. It’s interesting that they are aware that their citizens are visiting. Hmm.

I have software that allows me to A/B test which means I could change up something on the graphic novel homepage and see if it gets more reaction than a previous version. But, I barely have the time to publish a new blog or episode much less create different versions and test them. A one-man-show has its limitations.

The rest of the tracking methods highlighted in the above article require a lot of devious programming. Since I have my hands full with the basics, this stuff is way above my pay grade. Even if it wasn’t, I think it all goes a bit too far.

Personally, I deplore most internet advertising. I know that makes me a hypocrite since I use it from time to time to drive traffic to my site. I also realize that it is probably a necessary evil. Sites need revenue, or they can’t pump out the content on which we have come to rely. Unfortunately, the landscape often turns into a melee. Tumblr is a good example. Initially, they integrated their ads into the format of their posts. So as you are scrolling through the content, you see an ad within their signature brand presentation. Cool. Then they started doing separate in-line ads. These looked entirely different from their brand content, and the ads were those annoying things like “Grandma discovers the fountain of youth.” Not cool. Then they introduced this floating ad box that tracks you all the way down the page as you scroll through content. You get no break from it. It’s distracting, and based on the content, it can be horrifying, like Hillary Clinton staring at you for seven minutes. How much can a person take?

And it won't go away.
And it won’t go away.

Since my blog is future oriented, the question arises, what does this have to do with the future? It does. These marketing techniques will only become more sophisticated. Many of them already incorporate artificial intelligence to map your activity and predict your every want and need—maybe even the ones you didn’t think anyone knew you had. Is this an invasion of privacy? If it is, it’s going to get more invasive. And as I’m fond of saying, we need to pay attention to these technologies and practices, now or we won’t have a say in where they end up. As a society, we have to do better than just adapt to whatever comes along. We need to help point them in the right direction from the beginning.

 

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