Superintelligence. Is it the last invention we will ever need to make?

I believe it is crucial that we move beyond preparation to adapt or react to the future but to actively engage in shaping it.

An excellent example of this kind of thinking is Nick Bostrom’s TED talk from 2015.

Bostrom is concerned about the day when machine intelligence exceeds human intelligence (the guess is somewhere between twenty and thirty years from now). He points out that, “Once there is super-intelligence, the fate of humanity may depend on what the super-intelligence does. Think about it: Machine intelligence is the last invention that humanity will ever need to make. Machines will then be better at inventing [designing] than we are, and they’ll be doing so on digital timescales.”

His concern is legitimate. How do we control something that is smarter than we are? Anticipating AI will require more strenuous design thinking than that which produces the next viral game, app, or service. But these applications are where the lion’s share of the money is going. When it comes to keeping us from being at best irrelevant or at worst an impediment to AI, Bostrom is guardedly optimistic about how we can approach it. He thinks we could, “[…]create an A.I. that uses its intelligence to learn what we value, and its motivation system is constructed in such a way that it is motivated to pursue our values or to perform actions that it predicts we would approve of.”

At the crux of his argument and mine: “Here is the worry: Making superintelligent A.I. is a really hard challenge. Making superintelligent A.I. that is safe involves some additional challenge on top of that. The risk is that if somebody figures out how to crack the first challenge without also having cracked the additional challenge of ensuring perfect safety.”

Beyond machine learning (which has many facets), there are a wide-ranging set of technologies, from genetic engineering to drone surveillance, to next-generation robotics, and even VR, that could be racing forward without someone thinking about this “additional challenge.”

This could be an excellent opportunity for designers. But, to do that, we will have to broaden our scope to engage with science, engineering, and politics. More on that in future blogs.

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