Big-Data Algorithms. Don’t worry. Be happy.

 

It’s easier for us to let the data decide for us. At least that is the idea behind global digital design agency Huge. Aaron Shapiro is the CEO. He says, “The next big breakthrough in design and technology will be the creation of products, services, and experiences that eliminate the needless choices from our lives and make ones on our behalf, freeing us up for the ones we really care about: Anticipatory design.”

Buckminster Fuller wrote about Anticipatory Design Science, but this is not that. Trust me. Shapiro’s version is about allowing big data, by way of artificial intelligence and neural networks, to become so familiar with us and our preferences that it anticipates what we need to do next. In this vision, I don’t have to decide what to wear, or eat, or how to get to work, or when to buy groceries, or gasoline, what color trousers go with my shoes and also when it’s time to buy new shoes. No decisions will be necessary. Interestingly, Shapiro sees this as a good thing. The idea comes from a flurry of activity about something called decision fatigue. What is that? In a nutshell, it says that our decision-making capacity is a reservoir that gradually gets depleted the more decisions we make, possibly as a result of body chemistry. After a long string of decisions, according to the theory, we are more likely to make a bad decision or none at all. Things like willpower disintegrate along with our decision-making.

Among the many articles in the last few months on this topic was FastCompany, who wrote that,

“Anticipatory design is fundamentally different: decisions are made and executed on behalf of the user. The goal is not to help the user make a decision, but to create an ecosystem where a decision is never made—it happens automatically and without user input. The design goal becomes one where we eliminate as many steps as possible and find ways to use data, prior behaviors and business logic to have things happen automatically, or as close to automatic as we can get.”

Supposedly this frees “us up for the ones we really care about.”
My questions are, who decides which questions are important? And once we are freed from making decisions, will we even know that we have missed on that we really care about?

Google Now is a digital assistant that not only responds to a user’s requests and questions, but predicts wants and needs based on search history. Pulling flight information from emails, meeting times from calendars and providing recommendations of where to eat and what to do based on past preferences and current location, the user simply has to open the app for their information to compile.”

It’s easy to forget that AI as we currently know it goes under the name of Facebook or Google or Apple or Amazon. We tend to think of AI as some ghostly future figure or a bank of servers, or an autonomous robot. It reminds me a bit of my previous post about Nick Bostrom and the development of SuperIntelligence. Perhaps it is a bit like an episode of Person of Interest. As we think about designing systems that think for us and decide what is best for us, it might be a good idea to think about what it might be like to no longer think—as long as we still can.

 

 

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