Paying attention.

I want to make a Tshirt. On the front, it will say, “7 years is a long time.” On the back, it will say, “Pay attention!”

What am I talking about? I’ll start with some background. This semester, I am teaching a collaborative studio with designers from visual communications, interior design, and industrial design. Our topic is Humane Technologies, and we are examining the effects of an Augmented Reality (AR) system that could be ubiquitous in 7 years. The process began with an immersive scan of the available information and emerging advances in AR, VR, IoT, human augmentation (HA) and, of course, AI. In my opinion, these are a just a few of the most transformative technologies currently attracting the heaviest investment across the globe. And where the money goes there goes the most rapid advancement.

A conversation starter.

One of the biggest challenges for the collaborative studio class (myself included) is to think seven years out. Although we read Kurzweil’s Law of Accelerating Returns, our natural tendency is to think linearly, not exponentially. One of my favorite Kurzweil illustrations is this:

“Exponentials are quite seductive because they start out sub-linear. We sequenced one ten-thousandth of the human genome in 1990 and two ten-thousandths in 1991. Halfway through the genome project, 7 ½ years into it, we had sequenced 1 percent. People said, “This is a failure. Seven years, 1 percent. It’s going to take 700 years, just like we said.” Seven years later it was done, because 1 percent is only seven doublings from 100 percent — and it had been doubling every year. We don’t think in these exponential terms. And that exponential growth has continued since the end of the genome project. These technologies are now thousands of times more powerful than they were 13 years ago, when the genome project was completed.”1

So when I hear a policymaker, say, “We’re a long way from that,” I cringe. We’re not a long way away from that. The iPhone was introduced on June 29, 2007, not quite ten years ago. The ripple-effects from that little technological marvel are hard to catalog. With the smartphone, we have transformed everything from social and behavioral issues to privacy and safety. As my students examine the next possible phase of our thirst for the latest and greatest, AR (and it’s potential for smartphone-like ubiquity), I want them to ask the questions that relate to supporting systems, along with the social and ethical repercussions of these transformations. At the end of it all, I hope that they will walk away with an appreciation for paying attention to what we make and why. For example, why would we make a machine that would take away our job? Why would we build a superintelligence? More often than not, I fear the answer is because we can.

Our focus on the technologies mentioned above is just a start. There are more than these, and we shouldn’t forget things like precise genetic engineering techniques such as CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing, neuromorphic technologies such as microprocessors configured like brains, the digital genome that could be the key to disease eradication, machine learning, and robotics.

Though they may sound innocuous by themselves, they each have gigantic implications for disruptions to society. The wild card in all of these is how they converge with each other and the results that no one anticipated. One such mutation would be when autonomous weapons systems (AI + robotics + machine learning) converge with an aggregation of social media activity to predict, isolate and eliminate a viral uprising.

From recent articles and research by the Department of Defense, this is no longer theoretical; we are actively pursuing it. I’ll talk more about that next week. Until then, pay attention.

 

1. http://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/news/2016/09/06/exclusivegoogle-singularity-visionary-ray.htm
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