Tag Archives: Google

Surveillance. Are we defenseless?

Recent advancements in AI that are increasing exponentially (in areas such as facial recognition) demonstrate a level of sophistication in surveillance that renders most of us indefensible. There is a new transparency, and virtually every global citizen is a potential microbe for scrutiny beneath the microscope. I was blogging about this before I ever set eyes on the CBS drama Person of Interest, but the premise that surveillance could be ubiquitous is very real. The series depicts a mega, master computer that sees everything, but the idea of gathering a networked feed of the world’s cameras and a host of other accessible devices into a central data facility where AI sorts, analyzes and learns what kind of behavior is potentially threatening, is well within reach. It isn’t even a stretch that something like it already exists.

As with most technologies, however, they do not exist in a vacuum. Technologies converge. Take, for example, a recent article in WIRED about how accurate facial recognition is becoming even when the subject is pixelated or blurred. A common tactic to obscure the identity of video witness or an innocent bystander is to blur or to pixelate their face; a favored technique of Google Maps. Just go to any big city street view and Google has systematically obscured license plates and faces. Today these methods no longer compete against state-of-the-art facial recognition systems.

The next flag is the escalating sophistication of hacker technology. One of the most common methods is malware. Through an email or website, malware can infect a computer and raise havoc. Criminals often use it to ransom a victim’s computer before removing the infection. But not all hackers are criminals, per se. The FBI is pushing for the ability to use malware to digital wiretap or otherwise infiltrate potentially thousands of computers using only a single warrant. Ironically, FBI Director James Comey recently admitted that he puts tape over the camera on his personal laptop. I wrote about this a few weeks back What does that say about the security of our laptops and devices?

Is the potential for destructive attacks on our devices is so pervasive that the only defense we have is duct tape? We can track as far back as Edward Snowden, the idea that the NSA can listen in on your phone even when it’s off. And since 2014, experts have confirmed that the technology exists. In fact, albeit sketchy, some apps purport to do exactly that. You won’t find them in the app store (for obvious reasons), but there are websites where you can click the “buy” button. According to the site Stalkertools.com, which doesn’t pass the legit news site test, (note the use of awesome) one these apps promises that you can:

• Record all phone calls made and received, hear everything being said because you can record all calls and even listen to them at a later date.
• GPS Tracking, see on a map on your computer, the exact location of the phone
• See all sites that are opened on the phone’s web browser
• Read all the messages sent and received on IM apps like Skype, Whatsapp and all the rest
• See all the passwords and logins to sites that the person uses, this is thanks to the KeyLogger feature.
• Open and close apps with the awesome “remote control” feature
• Read all SMS messages and see all photos send and received on text messages
• See all photos taken with the phone’s camera

“How it work” “ The best monitoring for protect family” — Yeah. Sketchy.
“How it work” “ The best monitoring for protect family” — Sketchy, you think?

I visited one of these sites (above) and, frankly, I would never click a button on a website that can’t form a sentence in English, and I would not recommend that you do either. Earlier this year, the UK Independent published an article where Kelli Burns, a mass communication professor at the University of South Florida, alleged that Facebook regularly listens to users phone conversations to see what people are talking about. Of course, she said she can’t be certain of that.

Nevertheless, it’s out there, and if it has not already happened eventually, some organization or government will find a way to network the access points and begin collecting information across a comprehensive matrix of data points. And, it would seem that we will have to find new forms of duct tape to attempt to manage whatever privacy we have left. I found a site that gives some helpful advice for determining whether someone is tapping your phone.

Good luck.

 

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Did we design this future?

 

I have held this discussion before, but a recent video from FastCompany reinvigorates a provocative aspect concerning our design future, and begs the question: Is it a future we’ve designed? It centers around the smartphone. There are a lot of cool things about our smartphones like convenience, access, connectivity, and entertainment, just to name a few. It’s hard to believe that Steve Jobs introduced the very first iPhone just nine years ago on June 29, 2007. It was an amazing device, and it’s no shocker that it took off like wildfire. According to stats site Statista, “For 2016, the number of smartphone users is forecast to reach 2.08 billion.” Indeed, we can say, they are everywhere. In the world of design futures, the smartphone becomes Exhibit A of how an evolutionary design change can spawn a complex system.

Most notably, there are the billions of apps that are available to users that promise a better way to calculate tips, listen to music, sleep, drive, search, exercise, meditate, or create. Hence, there is a gigantic network of people who make their living supplying user services. These are direct benefits to society and commerce. No doubt, our devices have also often saved us countless hours of analog work, enabled us to manage our arrivals and departures, and keep in contact (however tenuous) with our friends and acquaintances. Smartphones have helped us find people in distress and help us locate persons with evil intent. But, there are also unintended consequences, like legislation to keep us from texting and driving because these actions have also taken lives. There are issues with dependency and links to sleep disorders. Some lament the deterioration of human, one-on-one, face-to-face, dialog and the distracted conversations at dinner or lunch. There are behavioral disorders, too. Since 2010 there has been a Smartphone Addiction Rating Scale (SARS) and the Young Internet Addiction Scale (YIAS). Overuse of mobile phones has prompted dozens of studies into adolescents as well as adults, and there are links to increased levels of ADHD, and a variety of psychological disorders including stress and depression.

So, while we rely on our phones for all the cool things they enable us to do we are—in less than ten years—experiencing a host of unintended consequences. One of these is privacy. Whether Apple or another brand, the intricacies of smartphone technology are substantially the same. This video shows why your phone is so easy to hack, to activate your phone’s microphone, camera, access your contact list or track your location. And, with the right tools, it is frighteningly simple. What struck me most after watching the video was not how much we are at risk of being hacked, eavesdropped on, or perniciously viewed, but the comments from a woman on the street. She said, “I don’t have anything to hide.” It is not the first millennial that I have heard say this. And that is what, perhaps, bothers me most—our adaptability based on the slow incremental erosion of what used to be our private space.

We can’t rest responsibility entirely on the smartphone. We have to include the idea of social media going back to the days of (amusingly) MySpace. Sharing yourself with a group of close friends gradually gave way to the knowledge that the photo or info may also get passed along to complete strangers. It wasn’t, perhaps your original intention, but, oh well, it’s too late now. Maybe that’s when we decided that we had better get used to sharing our space, our photos (compromising or otherwise), our preferences, our adventures and misadventures with outsiders, even if they were creeps trolling for juicy tidbits. As we chalked up that seemingly benign modification of our behavior to adaptability, the first curtain fell. If someone is going to watch me, and there’s nothing I can do about it, then I may as well get used to it. We adjusted as a defense mechanism. Paranoia was the alternative, and no one wants to think of themselves as paranoid.

A few weeks ago, I posted an image of Mark Zuckerberg’s laptop with tape over the camera and microphone. Maybe he’s more concerned with privacy since his world is full of proprietary information. But, as we become more accustomed to being both constantly connected and potentially tracked or watched, when will the next curtain fall? If design is about planning, directing or focusing, then the absence of design would be ignoring, neglecting or turning away. I return to the first question in this post: Did we design this future? If not, what did we expect?

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Privacy or paranoia?

 

If you’ve been a follower of this blog for a while, then you know that I am something of a privacy wonk. I’ve written about it before (about a dozen times, such as), and I’ve even built a research project (that you can enact yourself) around it. A couple of things transpired this week to remind me that privacy is tenuous. (It could also be all the back episodes of Person of Interest that I’ve been watching lately or David Staley’s post last April about the Future of Privacy.) First, I received an email from a friend this week alerting me to a little presumption that my software is spying on me. I’m old enough to remember when you purchased software on as a set of CDs (or even disks). You loaded in on your computer, and it seemed to last for years before you needed to upgrade. Let’s face it, most of us use only a small subset of the features in our favorite applications. I remember using Photoshop 5 for quite awhile before upgrading and the same with the rest of what is now called the Adobe Creative Suite. I still use the primary features of Photoshop 5, Illustrator 10 and InDesign (ver. whatever), 90% of the time. In my opinion, the add-ons to those apps have just slowed things down, and of course, the expense has skyrocketed. Gone are the days when you could upgrade your software every couple of years. Now you have to subscribe at a clip of about $300 a year for the Adobe Creative Suite. Apparently, the old business model was not profitable enough. But then came the Adobe Creative Cloud. (Sound of an angelic chorus.) Now it takes my laptop about 8 minutes to load into the cloud and boot up my software. Plus, it stores stuff. I don’t need it to store stuff for me. I have backup drives and archive software to do that for me.

Back to the privacy discussion. My friend’s email alerted me to this little tidbit hidden inside the Creative Cloud Account Manager.

Learn elsewhere, please.
Learn elsewhere, please.

Under the Security and Privacy tab, there are a couple of options. The first is Desktop App Usage. Here, you can turn this on or off. If it’s on, one of the things it tracks is,

“Adobe feature usage information, such as menu options or buttons selected.”

That means it tracks your keystrokes. Possibly this only occurs when you are using that particular app, but uh-uh, no thanks. Switch that off. Next up is a more pernicious option; it’s called, Machine Learning. Hmm. We all know what that is and I’ver written about that before, too. Just do a search. Here, Adobe says,

“Adobe uses machine learning technologies, such as content analysis and pattern recognition, to improve our products and services. If you prefer that Adobe not analyze your files to improve our products and services, you can opt-out of machine learning at any time.”

Hey, Adobe, if you want to know how to improve your products and services, how about you ask me, or better yet, pay me to consult. A deeper dive into ‘machine learning’ tells me more. Here are a couple of quotes:

“Adobe uses machine learning technologies… For example, features such as Content-Aware Fill in Photoshop and facial recognition in Lightroom could be refined using machine learning.”

“For example, we may use pattern recognition on your photographs to identify all images of dogs and auto-tag them for you. If you select one of those photographs and indicate that it does not include a dog, we use that information to get better at identifying images of dogs.”

Facial recognition? Nope. Help me find dog pictures? Thanks, but I think I can find them myself.

I know how this works. The more data that the machine can feed on the better it becomes at learning. I would just rather Adobe get their data by searching it out for it themselves. I’m sure they’ll be okay. (Afterall there’s a few million people who never look at their account settings.) Also, keep in mind, it’s their machine not mine.

The last item on my privacy rant just validated my paranoia. I ran across this picture of Facebook billionaire Mark Zuckerberg hamming it up for his FB page.

zuckerberg copy

 

In the background, is his personal laptop. Upon closer inspection, we see that Zuck has a piece of duct tape covering his laptop cam and his dual microphones on the side. He knows.

zuckcloseup

 

Go get a piece of tape.

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Vision comes from looking to the future.

 

I was away last week, but I left off with a post about proving that some of the things that we current think of as sci-fi or fantasy are not only plausible, but some may even be on their way to reality. In the last post, I was providing the logical succession toward implantable technology or biohacking.

The latest is a robot toy from a company called Anki. Once again, WIRED provided the background on this product, and it is an excellent example of technological convergence which I have discussed many times before. Essentially, “technovergence” is when multiple cutting-edge technologies come together in unexpected and sometimes unpredictable ways. In this case, the toy brings together AI, machine learning, computer vision science, robotics, deep character development, facial recognition, and a few more. According to the video below,

“There have been very few applications where a robot has felt like a character that connects with humans around it. For that, you really need artificial intelligence and robotics. That’s been the missing key.”

According to David Pierce, with WIRED,

“Cozmo is a cheeky gamer; the little scamp tried to fake me into tapping my block when they didn’t match, and stormed off when I won. And it’s those little tics, the banging of its lift-like arm and spinning in circles and squawking in its Wall-E voice, that really makes you want to refer to the little guy as ‘he’ rather than ‘it.’”

What strikes me as especially interesting is that my students designed their own version of this last semester. (I’m pretty sure that they knew nothing about this particular toy.) The semester was a rigorous design fiction class that took a hard look at what was possible in the next five to ten years. For some, the class was something like hell, but the similarities and possibilities that my students put together for their robot are amazingly like Cozmo.

I think this is proof of more than what is possible; it’s evidence that vision comes from looking to the future.

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Future proof.

 

There is no such thing as future proof anything, of course, so I use the term to refer to evidence that a current idea is becoming more and more probable of something we will see in the future. The evidence I am talking about surfaced in a FastCo article this week about biohacking and the new frontier of digital implants. Biohacking has a loose definition and can reference using genetic material without regard to ethical procedures, to DIY biology, to pseudo-bioluminescent tattoos, to body modification for functional enhancement—see transhumanism. Last year, my students investigated this and determined that a society willing to accept internal implants was not a near-future scenario. Nevertheless, according to FastCo author Steven Melendez,

“a survey released by Visa last year that found that 25% of Australians are ‘at least slightly interested’ in paying for purchases through a chip implanted in their bodies.”

Melendez goes on to describe a wide variety of implants already in use for medical, artistic and personal efficiency and interviews Tim Shank, president of a futurist group called TwinCities+. Shank says,

“[For] people with Android phones, I can just tap their phone with my hand, right over the chip, and it will send that information to their phone..”

implants
Amal Graafstra’s Hands [Photo: courtesy of Amal Graafstra] c/o WIRED
The popularity of body piercings and tattoos— also once considered as invasive procedures—has skyrocketed. Implantable technology, especially as it becomes more functionally relevant could follow a similar curve.

I saw this coming some years ago when writing The Lightstream Chronicles. The story, as many of you know, takes place in the far future where implantable technology is mundane and part of everyday life. People regulate their body chemistry access the Lightstream (the evolved Internet) and make “calls” using their fingertips embedded with Luminous Implants. These future implants talk directly to implants in the brain, and other systemic body centers to make adjustments or provide information.

An ad for Luminous Implants, and the "tap" numbers for local attractions.
An ad for Luminous Implants, and the “tap” numbers for local attractions.
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When the stakes are low, mistakes are beneficial. In more weighty pursuits, not so much.

 

I’m from the old school. I suppose, that sentence alone makes me seem like a codger. Let’s call it the eighties. Part of the art of problem solving was to work toward a solution and get it as tight as we possibly could before we committed to implementation. It was called the design process and today it’s called “design thinking.” So it was heresy to me when I found myself, some years ago now, in a high-tech corporation where this was a doctrine ignored. I recall a top-secret, new product meeting in which the owner and chief technology officer said, “We’re going to make some mistakes on this, so let’s hurry up and make them.” He was not speaking about iterative design, which is part and parcel of the design process, he was talking about going to market with the product and letting the users illuminate what we should fix. Of course, the product was safe and met all the legal standards, but it was far from polished. The idea was that mass consumer trial-by-fire would provide us with an exponentially higher data return than if we tested all the possible permutations in a lab at headquarters. He was, apparently, ahead of his time.

In a recent FastCo article on Facebook’s race to be the leader in AI, author Daniel Terdiman cites some of Mark Zuckerberg’s mantras: “‘Move fast and break things,’ or ‘Done is better than perfect.’” We can debate this philosophically or maybe even ethically, but it is clearly today’s standard procedure for new technologies, new science and the incessant race to be first. Here is a quote from that article:

“Artificial intelligence has become a vital part of scaling Facebook. It’s already being used to recognize the faces of your friends in photographs, and curate your newsfeed. DeepText, an engine for reading text that was unveiled last week, can understand “with near-human accuracy” the content in thousands of posts per second, in more than 20 different languages. Soon, the text will be translated into a dozen different languages, automatically. Facebook is working on recognizing your voice and identifying people inside of videos so that you can fast forward to the moment when your friend walks into view.”

The story goes on to say that Facebook, though it is pouring tons of money into AI, is behind the curve, having begun only three or so years ago. Aside from the fact that FB’s accomplishments seem fairly impressive (at least to me), people like Google and Microsoft are apparently way ahead. In the case of Microsoft, the effort began more than twenty years ago.

Today, the hurry up is accelerated by open sourcingWikipedia explains the benefits of open sourcing as:

“The open-source model, or collaborative development from multiple independent sources, generates an increasingly more diverse scope of design perspective than any one company is capable of developing and sustaining long term.”

The idea behind open sourcing is that the mistakes will happen even faster along with the advancements. It is becoming the de facto approach to breakthrough technologies. If fast is the primary, maybe even the only goal, it is a smart strategy. Or is it a touch short sighted? As we know, not everyone who can play with the code that a company has given them has that company’s best interests in mind. As for the best interests of society, I’m not sure those are even on the list.

To examine our motivations and the ripples that emanate from them, of course, is my mission with design fiction and speculative futures. Whether we like it or not, a by-product of technological development—aside from utopia—is human behavior. There are repercussions from the things we make and the systems that evolve from them. When your mantra is “Move fast and break things,” that’s what you’ll get. But there is certainly no time the move-fast loop to consider the repercussions of your actions, or the unexpected consequences. Consequences will appear all by themselves.

The technologists tell us that when we reach the holy grail of AI (whatever that is), we will be better people and solve the world’s most challenging problems. But in reality, it’s not that simple. With the nuances of AI, there are potential problems, or mistakes, that could be difficult to fix; new predicaments that humans might not be able to solve and AI may not be inclined to resolve on our behalf.

In the rush to make mistakes, how grave will they be? And, who is responsible?

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Design fiction. I want to believe.

 

I have blogged in the past about logical succession. When it comes to creating realistic design fiction narrative, there needs to be a sense of believability. Coates1 calls this “plausible reasoning.”, “[…]putting together what you know to create a path leading to one or several new states or conditions, at a distance in time.” In other words, for the audience to suspend their disbelief, there has to be a basic understanding of how we got here. If you depict something that is too fantastic, your audience won’t buy it, especially if you are trying to say that, “This could happen.”

“When design fictions are conceivable and realistically executed they carry a greater potential for making an impact and focusing discussion and debate around these future scenarios.”2

In my design futures collaborative studio, I ask students to do a rigorous investigation of future technologies, the ones that are on the bleeding edge. Then I want them to ask, “What if?” It is easier said than done. Particularly because of technological convergence, the way technologies merge with other technologies to form heretofore unimagined opportunities.

There was an article this week in Wired Magazine concerning a company called Magic Leap. They are in the MR business, mixed reality as opposed to virtual reality. With MR, the virtual imagery happens within the space you’re in—in front of your eyes—rather than in an entirely virtual space. The demo from Wired’s site is pretty convincing. The future of MR and VR, for me, are easy to predict. Will it get more realistic? Yes. Will it get cheaper, smaller, and ubiquitous? Yes. At this point, a prediction like this is entirely logical. Twenty-five years ago it would not have been as easy to imagine.

As the Wired article states,

“[…]the arrival of mass-market VR wasn’t imminent.[…]Twenty-five years later a most unlikely savior emerged—the smartphone! Its runaway global success drove the quality of tiny hi-res screens way up and their cost way down. Gyroscopes and motion sensors embedded in phones could be borrowed by VR displays to track head, hand, and body positions for pennies. And the processing power of a modern phone’s chip was equal to an old supercomputer, streaming movies on the tiny screen with ease.”

To have predicted that VR would be where it is today with billions of dollars pouring into fledgling technologies and realistic, and utterly convincing demonstrations would have been illogical. It would have been like throwing a magnet into a bucket of nails, rolling it around and guessing which nails would end up coming out attached.

What is my point? I think it is important to remind ourselves that things will move blindingly fast particularly when companies like Google and Facebook are throwing money at them. Then, the advancement of one only adds to the possibilities of the next iteration possibly in ways that no one can predict. As VR or MR merges with biotech or artificial reality, or just about anything else you can imagine, the possibilities are endless.

Unpredictable technology makes me uncomfortable. Next week I’ll tell you why.

 

  1. Coates, J.F., 2010. The future of foresight—A US perspective. Technological Forecasting & Social Change 77, 1428–1437.
  2. E. Scott Denison. “Timed-release Design Fiction: A Digital Online Methodology to Provoke Reflection on our Socio- Technological Future.”  Edited by Michal Derda Nowakowski. ISBN: 978-1-84888-427-4 Interdisciplinary.net.
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Nine years from now.

 

Today I’m on my soapbox, again, as an advocate of design thinking, of which design fiction is part of the toolbox.

In 2014, the Pew Research Center published a report on Digital Life in 2025. Therein, “The report covers experts’ views about advances in artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, and their impact on jobs and employment.” Their nutshell conclusion was that:

“Experts envision automation and intelligent digital agents permeating vast areas of our work and personal lives by 2025, (9 years from now), but they are divided on whether these advances will displace more jobs than they create.”

On the upside, some of the “experts” believe that we will, as the brilliant humans that we are, invent new kinds of uniquely human work that we can’t replace with AI—a return to an artisanal society with more time for leisure and our loved ones. Some think we will be freed from the tedium of work and find ways to grow in some other “socially beneficial” pastime. Perhaps we will just be chillin’ with our robo-buddy.

On the downside, there are those who believe that not only blue-collar, robotic, jobs will vanish, but also white-collar, thinking jobs, and that will leave a lot of people out of work since there are only so many jobs as clerks at McDonald’s or greeters at Wal-Mart. They think that some of these are the fault of education for not better preparing us for the future.

A few weeks ago I blogged about people who are thinking about addressing these concerns with something called Universal Basic Income (UBI), a $12,000 gift to everyone in the world since everyone will be out of work. I’m guessing (though it wasn’t explicitly stated) that this money would come from all the corporations that are raking in the bucks by employing the AI’s, the robots and the digital agents, but who don’t have anyone on the payroll anymore. The advocates of this idea did not address whether the executives at these companies, presumably still employed, will make more than $12,000, nor whether the advocates themselves were on the 12K list. I guess not. They also did not specify who would buy the services that these corporations were offering if we are all out of work. But I don’t want to repeat that rant here.

I’m not as optimistic about the unique capabilities of humankind to find new, uniquely human jobs in some new, utopian artisanal society. Music, art, and blogs are already being written by AI, by the way. I do agree, however, that we are not educating our future decision-makers to adjust adequately to whatever comes along. The process of innovative design thinking is a huge hedge against technology surprise, but few schools have ever entertained the notion and some have never even heard of it. In some cases, it has been adopted, but as a bastardized hybrid to serve business-as-usual competitive one-upmanship.

I do believe that design, in its newest and most innovative realizations, is the place for these anticipatory discussions and future. What we need is thinking that encompasses a vast array of cross-disciplinary input, including philosophy and religion, because these issues are more than black and white, they are ethically and morally charged, and they are inseparable from our culture—the scaffolding that we as a society use to answer our most existential questions. There is a lot of work to do to survive ourselves.

 

 

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Sitting around with my robo-muse and collecting a check.

 

Writing a weekly blog can be a daunting task especially amid teaching, research and, of course, the ongoing graphic novel. I can only imagine the challenge for those who do it daily. Thank goodness for friends who send me articles. This week the piece comes from The New York Times tech writer Farhad Manjoo. The article is entitled, “A Plan in Case Robots Take the Jobs: Give Everyone a Paycheck.” The topic follows nicely on the heels of last week’s blog about the inevitability of robot-companions. Unfortunately, both the author and the people behind this idea appear to be woefully out of touch with reality.

Here is the premise: After robots and AI have become ubiquitous and mundane, what will we do with ourselves? “How will society function after humanity has been made redundant? Technologists and economists have been grappling with this fear for decades, but in the last few years, one idea has gained widespread interest — including from some of the very technologists who are now building the bot-ruled future,” asks Manjoo.

The answer, strangely enough, seems to be coming from venture capitalists and millionaires like Albert Wenger, who is writing a book on the idea of U.B. I. — universal basic income — and Sam Altman, president of the tech incubator Y Combinator. Apparently, they think that $1,000 a month would be about right, “…about enough to cover housing, food, health care and other basic needs for many Americans.”

This equation, $12,000 per year, possibly works for the desperately poor in rural Mississippi. Perhaps it is intended for some 28-year-old citizen with no family or social life. Of course, there would be no money for that iPhone, or cable service. Such a mythical person has a $300 rent controlled apartment (utilities included), benefits covered by the government, doesn’t own a car, or buy gas or insurance, and then maybe doesn’t eat either. Though these millionaires clearly have no clue about what it costs the average American to eek out a living, they have identified some other fundamental questions:

“When you give everyone free money, what do people do with their time? Do they goof off, or do they try to pursue more meaningful pursuits? Do they become more entrepreneurial? How would U.B.I. affect economic inequality? How would it alter people’s psychology and mood? Do we, as a species, need to be employed to feel fulfilled, or is that merely a legacy of postindustrial capitalism?”

The Times article continues with, “Proponents say these questions will be answered by research, which in turn will prompt political change. For now, they argue the proposal is affordable if we alter tax and welfare policies to pay for it, and if we account for the ways technological progress in health care and energy will reduce the amount necessary to provide a basic cost of living.”

Often, the people that float ideas like this paint them as utopia, but I have a couple of additional questions. Why are venture capitalists interested in this notion? Will they also reduce their income to $1,000 per month? Seriously, that never happens. Instead, we see progressives in government and finance using an equation like this: “One thousand for you. One hundred thousand for me. One thousand for you. One hundred thousand for me…”

Fortunately, it is an unlikely scenario, because it would not move us toward equality but toward a permanent under-class forever dependent on those who have. Scary.

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Your robot buddy is almost ready.

 

There is an impressive video out this week showing a rather adept robot going through the paces, so to speak, getting smacked down and then getting back up again. The year is 2016, and the technology is striking. The company is Boston Dynamics. One thing you know from reading this blog is that I ascribe to The Law of Accelerating Returns. So, as we watch this video, if we want to be hyper-critical we can see that the bot still needs some shepherding, tentatively handles the bumpy terrain, and is slow to get up after a violent shove to the floor. On the other hand, if you are at all impressed with the achievement, then you know that the people working on this will only make it better, agiler, more svelt, and probably faster on the comeback. Let’s call this ingredient one.

 

Last year I devoted several blogs to the advancement of AI, about the corporations rushing to be the go-to source for the advanced version of predictive behavior and predictive decision-making. I have also discussed systems like Amazon Echo that use the advanced Alexa Voice Service. It’s something like Siri on steroids. Here’s part of Amazon’s pitch:

“• Hears you from across the room with far-field voice recognition, even while music is playing
• Answers questions, reads audiobooks and the news, reports traffic and weather, gives info on local businesses, provides sports scores and schedules, and more with Alexa, a cloud-based voice service
• Controls lights, switches, and thermostats with compatible WeMo, Philips Hue, Samsung SmartThings, Wink, Insteon, and ecobee smart home devices
•Always getting smarter and adding new features and skills…”

You’re supposed to place it in a central position in the home where it is proficient at picking up your voice from the other room. Just don’t go too far. The problem with Echo is that its stationery. Call Echo ingredient two. What Echo needs is ingredient one.

Some of the biggest players in the AI race right now are Google, Amazon, Apple, Facebook, IBM, Elon Musk, and the military, but the government probably won’t give you a lot of details on that. All of these billion-dollar companies have a vested interest in machine learning and predictive algorithms. Not the least of which is Google. Google already uses Voice Search, “OK, Google.” to enable type-free searching. And their AI algorithm software TensorFlow has been open-sourced. The better that a machine can learn, the more reliable the Google autonomous vehicle will be. Any one of these folks could be ingredient three.

I’m going to try and close the loop on this, at least for today. Guess who bought Boston Dynamics last year? That would be corporation X, formerly known as Google X.

 

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