Tag Archives: nanotechnology

There’s a hack for that.

In The Lightstream Chronicles circa 2159, the government of New Asia (virtually the whole world) owns the Lightstream. The Lightstream is the evolution of what we think of as the Internet today. It is a photo-fast unlimited transmission space that channels everything from your DNA, to your recent V (virtual) experience. It’s considered un-hackable because any intrusion is instantly traceable. It was engineered that way back in the 21st century when New Asia’s breadth was expanding and the government realized that anything other than complete control was just an accident waiting to happen. Since virtually anything consensual is legal and the public is convinced that only AI has access to their private behavior, most don’t consider this a breach of freedom or privacy. But that’s the future…

I recently came across an article in The New York Times about a new web service called the Hackers List, where you can hire a hacker. According to the site HL site, “Hiring a hacker shouldn’t be a difficult process, we believe that finding a trustworthy professional hacker for hire should be a worry free and painless experience.” I’ve always thought so. According to TNYT, “It is done anonymously, with the website’s operator collecting a fee on each completed assignment. The site offers to hold a customer’s payment in escrow until the task is completed, “ and over 500 jobs have been put out for bid, including everything from getting into someone’s email to grabbing a company’s database. Yes, we’ve monetized and consumerized hacking.

Now it may seem as though this next item is unrelated, but reserve judgement. A recent article in WIRED magazine tells us “Why the US Government is Terrified of Hobbyist Drones.” I’ve blogged on this before, but the whole drone thing has already escalated out of control. According to WIRED, the FAA held a conference that was open to civilians but closed to the press. At the conference,

“…officials played videos of low-cost drones firing semi-automatic weapons, revealed that Syrian rebels are importing consumer-grade drones to launch attacks, and flashed photos from an exercise that pitted $5,000 worth of drones against a convoy of armored vehicles. (The drones won.)” At the conference they showed something called the DJI Phantom 2 a, “quadcopter, strapped to 3 pounds of inert explosive.”

Hmmm. What have we here?
Hmmm. What have we here?

Interestingly, this was a newer version of the drone that landed on the White House lawn earlier this year. So the drone maker, a Chinese company that doesn’t want to loose it’s foothold on this booming market created a firmware update that incorporated something called GPS geofencing. The manufacturer has added the White House to a soon to be list of 10,000 places you will not be able to take your drone. Most of these are airports.

TNYT cited a spokesman from the drone maker,

“‘We do provide different layers of security to make it difficult to hack and get around,’” says DJI’s Perry. But for those determined to avoid geofencing, “there’s an easy way to do that, which is to buy another quad-copter.”

Now maybe you see the connection to the earlier item. So what are we to take from this? Well, we could say that this is another example of technology out of control. We could say that this is proof that with stuff like GPS geofencing we will always stay one step ahead of the hackers. I say this is just the beginning.

Of course, my residence and probably yours, too is not on the geofencing list. What about us?  But wait. Why not hire a hacker to set one up for you?

Fast forward two years: My telco is overcharging me for my premium channels. I log into the HakStore and download my $7.99 hack for that.

Think the Web is tangled now?

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On eavesdropping on your thoughts and the reason for fences.

Sending and receiving thoughts is not that far fetched.

Last year the science media was abuzz with the news that a thought (basically “hello”) was transmitted from India to France. The experiment was clunky and primitive with lots of wires and electrodes, and took 70 minutes to complete, but it was a step in the direction of telepathic transmission. 1. In other labs, scientists are finding ways to translate thoughts into words through implanted electrodes in the brain. 2  From these reports it would appear that telepathic transmissions like the ones shown in The Lightstream Chronicles are decades or more away. But, as we know, technology tracks an exponential growth. What used to take years or decades to develop now happens much faster. The mobile phone was once the size of a brick and could only make phone calls. Now the basic smart phone is a thousand times more powerful than the most sophisticated computer of 15 years ago. If we look at the speed with which technology expands then it is quite possible that some of our most sci-fi imaginings are really just around the corner. Both sets of researchers cite the obvious benefits for those who are speech impaired, paralyzed, or perhaps in a coma which would be tremendous breakthroughs for medicine and psychology. Of course, I tend to think toward the dark side. As the one researcher in the India-France experiment noted, “‘Could there be potential for sending someone a thought that’s not desirable to them?’ he says. ‘Those kinds of things are theoretically in the realm of possibility.’”

In this weeks episode of The Lightstream Chronicles, Keiji-T is eavesdropping on a conversation between Kristin Broulliard and Colonel Lee Chen. The intercepted data is analyzed the identities of the parties is verified and the transcript committed to memory — human or otherwise. Keiji-T’s marvelous technological features are a huge benefit to crime fighting. Before the introduction of Keiji-T’s state-of-the-art faculties thought transmissions were inaccessible. With so much implanted circuitry in the human brain the pioneers of telepathy created sophisticated and impenetrable encryptions to protect our thoughts and telepathic communications from being intercepted or “overheard”. With the introduction of the T-Class synthetic, that fence came down. All in the name of security, of course

In a broadly interpreted and paraphrased thought from the author G. K. Chesterton, (though this not really what he said), “Don’t ever take a fence down until you know the reason why it was put up.” (If you wan to know what he really said go here.) Nevertheless, the spirit of the quote stands. As a society we are forever tearing down fences in the name of anything from the greater good to freedom or security. The Lightstream Chronicles is sometimes a reminder that regardless of the sophistication of our implants, the human condition prevails.

Citations:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/scientists-prove-that-telepathic-communication-is-within-reach-180952868/?no-ist
http://phys.org/news180620740.html
http://www.chesterton.org/taking-a-fence-down/
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A taste of future-tech in the graphic novel.

If you are a regular to The Lightstream Chronicles, then you know that what you see on the Web is only a fraction of the detail that is available from the high-resolution PDF that accompanies each page. This week I thought I would highlight a few examples of plausible future tech that have occurred on recent pages.

The coffee

Just your average beverage replicator
Just your average beverage replicator

For example, soon after Kristin and Keiji entered her office back on page 93 Kristin offers Keiji coffee. There’s no Keurig in the office—at least not one that we would recognize—but there is a beverage replicator similar to the one that Marie used back on page 80 when she whipped up a Cabernet for Kristin. The beverage replicator, in this case, the same one that Marie used, a Maitre-deux™ kitchen food and beverage replicator. Model FVX-GNN42H71000.

Kristin “taps” in her favorite blend and delivers a freshly brewed cup of coffee including the cup. Since the flavor configuration can vary as well, Kristin prefers a French Press style at a precise 92.6 C. 325.309 ml. If you look closely into the background of page 93 you can see her making her selections.

The cups

A nanotherm cup.
A nanotherm cup.

The coffee cups that Kristin dispenses to hold a precise 325.309 ml. and are replicated bone china with a nanothermic structure that keeps the contents steaming hot—indefinitely—or until the liquid evaporates. That’s why you’ll catch a whiff of steam throughout this scene.

The desk & tablet

A simple intermediary.
A simple intermediary.

Kristin’s desk is an active surface. In other words it is able to transmit, receive and display (or project) information from any other active surface including the luminous implants that both Keiji-T and Kristin have embedded into their fingertips. (Everyone else in the world has them, too.)

The thin glass tablet that Keiji is “porting” to is simply an intermediate storage device that Kristin then transfers to her desk surface and, ultimately to holographic projection above her desk. The tablet can also store vast amounts of data for later access.

Just a sampling of some of the details in the background—a lot like the design and technology we take for granted everyday.

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A graphic novel about culture, design and transhumanism in the future

And you thought this blog was about writing a graphic novel.

Anyway, I’ve just returned from holiday, I have been virtually free from the computer for nearly a week. I finished two books, started a third, and did a lot of mental tweaking to my story.

Without tipping my hand (too far) to the plot of my graphic novel (since it is not 100% solidified), I can say that it has always dealt with ramifications and implications of a somewhat transhumanist future, a world where scientism rules the day. As the prologue to my screenplay states, “Scientific advances have enabled the manufacture of life-like robots. Known as synthetics, these robots are found in all walks of life and can be virtually indistinguishable from humans.” Some of my key characters fit this description and even my humans are considerably augmented, enhanced and amplified.

While my story includes a fair amount of mystery and action, I never intended the read to be one dimensional. I hope to thread some thought-provoking themes and opposing ideas into the mix. This is especially relevant in lieu of the fact that my paper, the whole design fiction aspect of this project, is an examination of the design culture relationship. What we design will affect our culture and vice versa. What happens when we are able to design and create near-humans? What will we teach them? How will we use them? What capabilities should they have or not have? What will separate our future, synthetically augmented human sons and daughters from their purely synthetic counterparts? What role will ethics play in this future drama? After all, there is no science to ethics.

Meanwhile, all of these questions seem to be surfacing around me in our current cultural environment as we see a flurry of discussion about Kurzweil’s optimistic singularity and Vernor Vinge’s less than optimistic predictions of that same technology gone astray. In fact, Kurzweil has even enlisted Michio Kaku, Deepak Chopra and a host of other “thinkers” and, of course the mandatory celebrities (no doubt for their scientific insight) for a live discussion on the topic that will be coming to a theater near you.

I guess this means my novel is timely.

I’ve also done some additional thinking on stylistic texture and setting, especially in light of the fact that recent press releases have put the locale for the upcoming screen adaptation of Akira in “New Manhattan”. Hmmm.

More on that later.

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