Tag Archives: NSA

Surveillance. Are we defenseless?

Recent advancements in AI that are increasing exponentially (in areas such as facial recognition) demonstrate a level of sophistication in surveillance that renders most of us indefensible. There is a new transparency, and virtually every global citizen is a potential microbe for scrutiny beneath the microscope. I was blogging about this before I ever set eyes on the CBS drama Person of Interest, but the premise that surveillance could be ubiquitous is very real. The series depicts a mega, master computer that sees everything, but the idea of gathering a networked feed of the world’s cameras and a host of other accessible devices into a central data facility where AI sorts, analyzes and learns what kind of behavior is potentially threatening, is well within reach. It isn’t even a stretch that something like it already exists.

As with most technologies, however, they do not exist in a vacuum. Technologies converge. Take, for example, a recent article in WIRED about how accurate facial recognition is becoming even when the subject is pixelated or blurred. A common tactic to obscure the identity of video witness or an innocent bystander is to blur or to pixelate their face; a favored technique of Google Maps. Just go to any big city street view and Google has systematically obscured license plates and faces. Today these methods no longer compete against state-of-the-art facial recognition systems.

The next flag is the escalating sophistication of hacker technology. One of the most common methods is malware. Through an email or website, malware can infect a computer and raise havoc. Criminals often use it to ransom a victim’s computer before removing the infection. But not all hackers are criminals, per se. The FBI is pushing for the ability to use malware to digital wiretap or otherwise infiltrate potentially thousands of computers using only a single warrant. Ironically, FBI Director James Comey recently admitted that he puts tape over the camera on his personal laptop. I wrote about this a few weeks back What does that say about the security of our laptops and devices?

Is the potential for destructive attacks on our devices is so pervasive that the only defense we have is duct tape? We can track as far back as Edward Snowden, the idea that the NSA can listen in on your phone even when it’s off. And since 2014, experts have confirmed that the technology exists. In fact, albeit sketchy, some apps purport to do exactly that. You won’t find them in the app store (for obvious reasons), but there are websites where you can click the “buy” button. According to the site Stalkertools.com, which doesn’t pass the legit news site test, (note the use of awesome) one these apps promises that you can:

• Record all phone calls made and received, hear everything being said because you can record all calls and even listen to them at a later date.
• GPS Tracking, see on a map on your computer, the exact location of the phone
• See all sites that are opened on the phone’s web browser
• Read all the messages sent and received on IM apps like Skype, Whatsapp and all the rest
• See all the passwords and logins to sites that the person uses, this is thanks to the KeyLogger feature.
• Open and close apps with the awesome “remote control” feature
• Read all SMS messages and see all photos send and received on text messages
• See all photos taken with the phone’s camera

“How it work” “ The best monitoring for protect family” — Yeah. Sketchy.
“How it work” “ The best monitoring for protect family” — Sketchy, you think?

I visited one of these sites (above) and, frankly, I would never click a button on a website that can’t form a sentence in English, and I would not recommend that you do either. Earlier this year, the UK Independent published an article where Kelli Burns, a mass communication professor at the University of South Florida, alleged that Facebook regularly listens to users phone conversations to see what people are talking about. Of course, she said she can’t be certain of that.

Nevertheless, it’s out there, and if it has not already happened eventually, some organization or government will find a way to network the access points and begin collecting information across a comprehensive matrix of data points. And, it would seem that we will have to find new forms of duct tape to attempt to manage whatever privacy we have left. I found a site that gives some helpful advice for determining whether someone is tapping your phone.

Good luck.

 

Bookmark and Share

Privacy is dead. Is the cyberpunk future already here?

This week, a brief thought to provoke thought. Surprisingly it has been 30 years since William Gibson released his groundbreaking work Neuromancer, that ushered in a decade of artistry inspired by the genre known as cyberpunk. Just a few days ago Paste Magazine ran an article, “Somebody’s Watching Me; Cyberpunk 30 Years On, and the Warnings We Didn’t Heed.” Therein, writer Brian Chidester delineates the fascinating influence of Gibson’s work on the music of the day as well as the ripples it continues to send into the present.

With my futurist, sci-fi, cyberpunk leanings, I was caught up with the observation of how much of Gibson’s, “…near-future where computer technology was woven into our DNA—where a virtual data sphere played the dominate role in the human interface,” is already here—and we didn’t notice—or as Chidester notes, “…quietly came to pass.”

The music connection is deep and profound but it is also intertwined with the events of the days and the decades to follow. From DARPA’s creation of the internet, to post-9/11 paranoia, the Patriot Act, WikiLeaks, Edward Snowden, Google, Twitter and Facebook, to the ubiquitous storage of cookies and individual user preferences (most of which are freely—even blithely—given), we, “…have, in essence, created business models that are a dream come true for the CIAs, FBIs and NSAs of the world.”

Yet perhaps more chilling than where we are, is how we got here.

“Google, Twitter and Facebook, lauded as broadening the scope of human potential, in fact, built algorithms to drive us to predictable results. Cookies store information on individual user preferences. They have, in essence, created business models that are a dream come true for the CIAs, FBIs and NSAs of the world.

Facebook has nearly a billion users, with tons of personal data on each one, proving that plenty of individuals are willing to provide private information to get something that is free and fun. Simply put: We’ve allowed ourselves to be smitten. The computer is now miniaturized, or, as Bruce Sterling predicted, ‘adorable.’ Christopher Shin, the engineer of Cellebrite, a device that aids the U.S. government in collecting information from cellular users, contends that the iPhone holds more personal information than any other device on the market.”

So if we can go from cyberpunk, science fiction, to present day future in 30 years, given the exponential growth of technology, were will be be smitten next: genetic engineering, transhumanism, synthetic biology?

Chidester concludes:

“If we stop to ask how we got here, we may look back and find the signs embedded in cyberpunk literature of 20-30 years prior. We may then wonder how we might better have heeded its warnings. But it is too late. Privacy, under the current paradigm, is essentially dead.”

What other cherished possession will be the next to fall?  Or have they all already fallen?

Bookmark and Share